Screenagers: Growing Up in the Digital Age

Date(s)

  • April 21, 2017 | 5:15 pm

Are you watching kids scroll through life, with their rapid-fire thumbs and a six-second attention span? Physician and filmmaker Delaney Ruston saw that with her own kids and learned that the average kid spends 6.5 hours a day looking at screens. She wondered about the impact of all this time and about the friction occurring in homes and schools around negotiating screen time—friction she knew all too well.

In SCREENAGERS, as with her award-winning documentaries on mental health, Delaney takes a deeply personal approach as she probes into the vulnerable corners of family life, including her own, to explore struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. Through poignant and unexpectedly funny stories along with surprising insights from authors, psychologists, and brain scientists, SCREENAGERS reveals how tech time impacts kids’ development and offers solutions on how adults can empower kids to best navigate the digital world and find balance.

Award-winning SCREENAGERS probes into the vulnerable corners of family life, including the director’s own, and depicts messy struggles over social media, video games, academics and internet addiction. Through surprising insights from authors and brain scientists solutions emerge on how we can empower kids to best navigate the digital world.

Delaney Ruston is a Stanford trained physician and social change documentary filmmaker who got the idea to make Screenagers while struggling with her kids over screen time. Looking around she saw the trends of more kids getting smart phones, more tech in schools, and more homework online and wondered what all this screen time meant. As a physician she wanted to understand the science of tech time on children’s development and as a mom she wanted to know what to do. Ultimately Delaney made Screenagers because she believes deeply in the importance of helping kids find balance in our tech-filled world. She is passionate about having the film be a vehicle to bring together parents, educators and kids so that change can happen not just in our homes but in our schools and communities too.

Run time is 1:05, and our showing will be followed by a discussion panel with local professionals to help attendees process the complexity of the issue and offer suggestions for addressing it at home. Due to the emotional depth of this documentary, we do not recommend bringing children under the age of 10.

Tickets – $5 (cash only) and will be sold at the door. Additional donations to our 501(c)(3) organization are gladly accepted.

Doors open at 5:15. Movie starts at 6:00. Seating capacity is limited to the first 400 attendees.

This documentary is not available for viewing through any online venue and can only been seen in private showings.

Popcorn and bottled water will be offered at a low price. Bring your current PTA Membership Card (RPS and surrounding county schools) and receive one free popcorn. No outside food or drinks permitted.